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September 15, 2017

Panda releases open letter to Trudeau: scrap proposed tanker ban, support Alberta oil

United Conservative Party Economic Development and Trade critic Prasad Panda today released an open letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau urging the Trudeau government to drop their ill-conceived tanker ban on British Columbia’s northern coast, and to support Alberta oil.

“I recently brought forward Motion 505 to the Alberta Legislature which urges the federal government to help build pipelines within Canada and shift from buying oil from countries with oppressive dictatorships,” Panda said. “This motion was unanimously adopted by all parties in the Alberta Legislature, including Premier Notley’s NDP government.  I am asking the Prime Minister to join with the unanimous voice of the elected representatives of our province and help achieve true energy independence for Canada and North America.”

Recent decisions made by the Trudeau government surrounding pipeline development have shown the process has moved away from trusting the world-class expertise of the National Energy Board, and instead has bowed to political agendas. The latest repercussion of these actions is the uncertainty now surrounding the Energy East pipeline project.

“The Prime Minister needs to understand that Alberta’s energy industry has been an economic engine from which all of Confederation has benefitted,” Panda said. “It’s incredibly disappointing to see Trudeau play politics with pipelines, when building pipelines in every direction will lessen our dependence on dictator oil and remove trade barriers.”

Coupled with the poor judgment on increasing pipeline access, Panda also questioned the introduction of Bill C-48, the Oil Tanker Moratorium Act which, if passed, would have a direct impact on Alberta’s economy.

“This legislation is ill-conceived, and will only serve to hurt our country,” Panda concluded. “I implore the Prime Minister to consider the points I have raised in my letter, and make decisions based on the viability of our energy economy, not political pressure.”